Sunday, December 4, 2016

7 Things We Tell Ourselves About Our Anxiety and Stress ...That Aren't Always True



There are myths about anxiety and stress we tell ourselves to get past those constant feelings of anxiousness, worry and stress. Some of these myths are:

“Everyone worries…”
“Feeling anxious all the time, is just a part of life.”
“Once I get past this challenge/problem, I won’t feel like this any longer.”
“This is just the way life is.  Everyone is stressed out.”
“There is nothing I can do to change how I am feeling.”
“Until all the problems are solved, I am just going to feel anxious.”
“It’s not that serious. This too shall pass.”  

In some ways, the above statements could be considered true.  Everyone does worry. Everyone does have stress and most people feel that once they solve all their problems, they will no longer be a victim of stress and anxiety.  

Statistics show:
  • Women are more likely than men (28 percent vs. 20 percent) to report having a great deal of stress (8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale).


  • Almost half of all women (49 percent) surveyed said their stress has increased over the past five years, compared to four in 10 (39 percent) men.


  •  Women are more likely to report that money (79 percent compared with 73 percent of men) and the economy (68 percent compared with 61 percent of men) are sources of stress while men are far more likely to cite that work is a source of stress (76 percent compared with 65 percent of women).


  • Women are more likely to report physical and emotional symptoms of stress than men, such as having had a headache (41 percent vs. 30 percent), having felt as though they could cry (44 percent vs. 15 percent), or having had an upset stomach or indigestion (32 percent vs. 21 percent) in the past month.


  • Married women report higher levels of stress than single women, with one-third (33 percent) reporting that they have experienced a great deal of stress in the past month (8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale) compared with one in five (22 percent) of single women. Similarly, significantly more married women report that their stress has increased over the past five years (56 percent vs. 41 percent of single women). Single women are also more likely than married women to say they feel they are doing enough to manage their stress (63 percent vs. 51 percent).



  •  Married women are more likely than single women to report they have experienced the following due to stress in the past month: feeling as though they could cry (54 percent vs. 33 percent), feeling irritable or angry (52 percent vs. 38 percent), having headaches (48 percent vs. 33 percent) and experiencing fatigue (47 percent vs. 35 percent).   
statistics from the American Psychological Association  



What is also true, is that you don’t have to always feel stressed, anxious, and full of worry.  There are things you can do to alleviate those feelings and start living a life without excessive stress and worry. 

When your stress and anxiety is at a level where you can’t concentrate, can’t sleep, you feel constantly overwhelmed and your life feels out of control, there are things you can do to make a change. 

I have been there and I learned how to overcome my anxious thoughts and stress using holistic method.   These methods (DeStressfirmations)  are taught in my online course DeStress TheMess.  In this course we talk about changes how diet, movement, EFT, essential oils, meditation, herbs, vitamin supplements and more can impact your anxiety and stress levels.

You don’t have to settle for the myths you tell yourself about stress and anxiety.  There are definitely things you can do that will help you live a life without continual feelings of stress and anxiety.






Click here to find out more about the course "DeStress The Mess"






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